My Design Wall is Full!

Here is what my design wall looks like today! There is a lot going on…

The right hand side has to do with my two upcoming workshops at Greenville Center for Creative Arts. The first, covering hexies and Grandmother’s Flower Garden is on Saturday. Six pointed stars is in July. Click here to get more info.

At the top right, you can see a quilt emerging, made up of (hand pieced) half hexagons. There are many ways to sew them together, but this is by far my favorite. It’s such a strong graphic design. The two plain colored areas in each block are my hand dyed fabrics and I have them strewn all over the floor as I pick them out.

The black stars in the middle are six pointed stars hand pieced in a Seven Sister sort of design. Below them is a pattern, first published in Godey’s Ladies Book in the mid 1800’s, called bricks. It is also a 60 degree diamond, but the “sides” of the brick shape are elongated.

The left hand side of the board is devoted to a deconstructed lone star. Using Moda precut fabrics, I have cut out stacks of 2.5″ x 5.5″ fabrics to sew on a Quiltsmart base. I hope to be giving a talk about how to make this amazing design at Island Quilters this Fall. Lots more coming about this project!

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Wonderful Quilters

Friday was such a fun day. Each Summer the North Carolina Quilt Symposium is held somewhere in the state. This year it was in Asheville so I made a date with a friend/quilter to attend for the day.

We went to a few quilt stores on our way north and after a yummy lunch, found our way to the UNC Asheville campus. This year they had an amazing group of teachers who each brought 3 or 4 quilts to hang with the participants’ quilts. When we paid our entrance fee, we were given a plastic glove so that we could look at the back of the quilts. To be able to see the quilts very close and check out the amazing quilting on the back was such a treat! Here are some of my favorites…

Susan Cleveland:

Though I took a class with her some years ago, it must have been before I started blogging. In any case, it was her Piping Hot Bindings workshop. She is an excellent (and fun!) instructor. If you have made bindings on quilts, you can understand that a teacher has to give very simple and clear directions for everyone to understand and be successful! This quilt, Flowered and Feathered Frenzy, is full of wonderful details showcasing her class content. There is a double binding around the wonky edges. There is both machine and hand quilting; the hand quilting she calls her “Morse Code” technique.

I was quite taken by these embroidered circles. And I love the color! I had just been complaining to my friend about all the dull grey quilts that everyone seems to like now. She pointed out that Susan’s quilt was grey. It is indeed, but the colors she used are brights – not the colors with grey added. It’s just wonderful.

Melinda Bula:

You may remember that I took a class with her to make her wonderful zinnia quilt. I can’t say enough about her stunning quilts and easy-going manner in the classroom. Looking at Waratah on the computer screen, I am struck by its beautiful graphic quality. In person you see her layers and layers of machine quilting and the lovely hand dyed fabrics that she often uses.

And her Monet in Pasadena. It was a hot day in Asheville and I wanted to swim among the lily pads.

Lea McComas:

I believe I saw this quilt in a magazine and I was delighted to be able to see it up close and personal. Bike Boys is amazing – Lea used 114 threads which added up to 8 miles of stitching.

This ad below was her inspiration! This is also a good shot to see her thread painting. Can you see how thick it is?

Barbara Olson:

I have seen Barbara Olson’s quilts many times at various quilt shows. Her work is constantly evolving and I was really struck by Life Unfolding. Do click on the picture to see the amazing detail, fabrics, colors and stitching!

And her Peacock Flower. (The Guild labeled this Stroke of Blue but on her website it is called Peacock Flower.) Talk about juicy color…

What is it about seeing art or fine craft in person? I feel refreshed and energized. I hope you do as well!

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Dyeing with Friends

I have been volunteering at Greenville Center for Creative Arts for a few months. They have gallery space and offer classes and host studio artists. When I volunteer, I sit at the front desk mulling over proposing some classes. I love teaching and sharing and getting to know creative souls and I haven’t done much of that since we moved to South Carolina. This Summer I am offering two quilting workshops (and crossing my fingers that they fill!). Another class idea that I had was teaching shibori dyeing. It’s so much fun to do and quite “trendy” now in home dec and even clothing. After a lot of thought, I asked some neighborhood friends to be my guinea pigs and help me decide whether teaching a shibori class was feasible. (I offered one many years ago at a craft fair and did remember that it was a lot of work…)

The class idea was to dye 6 napkins, each trying out a different shibori technique. I knew that this class could not be for many students; dyeing takes lots of water and space to dump dye buckets and the venue where I want to teach has limited sinks. Here are some of the supplies I’d need to take – only some of the junk that makes shibori dyeing so fun.

When teaching a class like this, there are so many variables. The main one is how long each person takes to complete the tying or clamping or sewing of their piece. And that’s the creative part – they shouldn’t be rushed then. The actual dye time is set; it’s about an hour. I used to teach dyeing at my house in Illinois and the ladies would bring lunch and we’d eat and chat as the cloth sat in the dyebath. The class I would offer at The Art Center would cost a lot more and I’m not sure the participants would welcome “empty time”, which the dyeing time seems to be. Then there is rinsing and the super fun part – unwrapping the cloth and seeing the results – and then much more washing. My friends and I took so long that one woman had to leave as she had an appointment!

We did have a fun time and here are Gale’s napkins. Poor photo, but wonderful designs and color.

Cheri chose a blue green and had very nice results.

Debbie’s napkins turned out the best, as far as the dye color. They were a different weight from the others, looked to be mercerized and were woven in a twill pattern. Everything makes a difference when you’re dyeing.

Can you guess what I concluded???  I will not be teaching shibori… I’m disappointed but it’s way too much work and aggravation … I will keep hoping that the quilting workshops fill and dream up some less complicated ideas for the Fall session.

 

 

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Finnegan – BeginAgain*

… i.e. a setback!

When I finally sat myself down to quilt the twin bed quilt, things went pretty well. Nevermind that I had hopes of getting it done for my niece’s visit April 1. It was smooth sailing.

Then I did something stupid and ended up with a big mess. What to do – rip out all of the quilting I had done, throw it in the trash or figure out how to re-make it. I stewed for a whole day about it. {I am so annoyed with myself that I am not going to confess what I did!} I finally decided to cut the quilt apart and sew parts of it back together – luckily I made it bigger than it needed to be. Now the quilt has log cabins on the top and borders all around. After re-pinning, I was set to go! Whew!

Back to quilting!

In the next unfortunate event, I was quilting away and the needle broke. That’s always a bit scary, but it was a small break and didn’t fly anywhere. I had a nagging feeling though and found the diagnostic screen on my Sweet 16. First was the needle test: rotate the hand wheel and if it made a continuous noise it was bad. The motor test was the same deal and both times the machine failed, making a nasty hum. I ignored the those test results and pressed the needle up and down button. Then she made a loud shrieking noise, which echoed on in my head. If you have a computerized sewing machine, you know that everything is fine tuned and because the needle probably broke on the bobbin, the motor timing was off. (shrieking in my head)

I took a time out and slept badly that night as I thought of driving all the way to my Sweet 16 dealer in Gaffney, SC, a 1.5 hour drive, there and back, there and back.

The next morning, before calling the dealer, I decided to do all the tests again. I remembered that this had happened with a previous machine and after giving it some time, the computer mechanism decided to work properly. And hallelujah, it worked! Crisis averted. No more shrieking in my head or by the machine.

So on this very gloomy day, I am happily quilting. (Cross fingers!)

*Finnegan BeginAgain kept running through my head as I dealt with these problems and I couldn’t place it; and you may not be able to either. After googling it, I was reminded that it is a nursery rhyme that was made into a song! Since I taught Second Grade for many years. it makes sense. It also may be a song that we sang at camp when I was a counselor. I tried to hum that to drown out the silent shriek…

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Weave a Potholder!

About a year ago, I bought an inexpensive loom at a big box store. It was not called a potholder loom and when I opened the box I realized why – the loopers are nylon and would melt if gotten too hot! The loom is smaller than I remembered and I had forgotten how much the fabric “shrinks” after it is taken off the loom. It results in about a 5″x5″ square. Really too small for getting hot items out of the oven. The colors are very pretty and it certainly will work well as a mug rug.

Recently I broke down and bought a big Harrisville Designs loom. My excuse was that my niece and family were planning a visit and she always likes me to have a craft project for them. Peter and I both wove one and he didn’t think he had ever made a potholder before.

My niece had planned a busy weekend of college visits for her youngest and I thought there would be little time for play. I had this basket on the kitchen table when they came home one day and they all said “what’s this stuff???” During the weekend three of them found the time for weaving.

This size loom makes a very useable square – about 8″. And this project is a two-fer; it’s both fun and useful! A friend commented that the loopers are expensive. Yes, they are, but they are knitted in the US and they are cotton and they come in gorgeous colors. I bought the brights colorway plus white and black; you can also buy bags of single colors or several mixes. Harrisville sells loopers in the small size so you can order lovely loopers for the loom you have.

One of the boys used the colors of SC State for his potholder. I told him that he could say that his great aunty made it, but he said, no, he would certainly tell his roommates that he had made it. Good man!

If you are a weaver, you can use the potholder loom to play with color & weave effects. The green, black and white potholder (in the Philadelphia Eagles colors!) is a 3 strand repeat, for instance. And to make this design process even more fun, Harrisville has a potholder designer! Check it out here, it’s lots of fun to fiddle with.

When was the last time you wove a potholder? When you were small, did you have a potholder loom? I do recall making them, but can’t remember where or when. If you like to make pretty and useful items, then I do suggest you buy yourself a loom – they are not just for kids. And if you have fun-loving relatives, then you must get one. I have already started a new one…

{N.B. I am not promoting Harrisville Designs for any reason other than they make a great loom! And they are the only ones who make a large size loom.}

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A Hand Quilt Along Goodbye…

… from me… My big handwork time of year is over and now the outdoors is calling to me. Time to weed and plant and dye and make the outside beautiful. I do intend to finish quilting that quilt, and when I do, I will let you know!

I do have some hand quilting for you to admire. My friend Louann (The Finisher!) has completed this lovely Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt that she began piecing some years ago. She started it when a friend taught us how to do English Paper Piecing, and she’s been hand quilting it on and off. Isn’t it lovely?

 

Happy Stitching ladies!

This Hand Quilt Along is an opportunity for hand quilters and piecers to share and motivate one another. We post every three weeks, to show our progress and encourage one another.  If you have a hand quilting project and would like to join our group contact Kathy at the link below.

KathyLoriMargaretKerryEmmaTracyDebConnieDeborah,  Susan, JessiscaSherryNanetteSassyEdith, and Sharon


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The Twin Bed Quilt

It has been some time since I did any machine quilting and the pile of tops hasn’t decreased. Yesterday I cleaned and oiled my Sweet 16, and Pfaff machine and added some “tattoo” decals from Urban Elementz for fun. I spend a lot of time in my studio on these machines and the tattoos tickle me!

Then I went to the unfinished quilt top cupboard and pulled out a twin bed quilt top. The (kids’) guest room quilt has been on the to do list for some time, to replace this Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt which really wasn’t meant as a bed quilt. Perhaps you can tell that I think of it this as a girl’s room…

Balsam Road Beauties

This top was finished some time ago, though I don’t think I posted about it being completed. It was in 2014, I am ashamed to say! I called the pattern structure, framed log cabin, though I will need to come up with a better name when it’s done. And now I am ready to quilt it. I consider it “cheating” to put a top on a bed before it’s been quilted, but it’s the easiest way to photograph it.

Framed Log Cabin

The inspiration for this quilt design was this cute floral print that I bought on a trip to Paducah. It was one of those times when I saw the fabric and I loved it so much, I had to stand there and think of a quilt to make with it. (Do you ever do that?) A log cabin with these small flowers at the centers was what I came up with.

Estrella by Vallori Wells

And look at the coordinating fabric for the back! I’m not sure which side I will like better.

The quilt measures about 66″ x 89″and though large, is manageable. How to quilt a top is always my dilemma… As I pin the layers together today, I’m mulling over ideas…

 

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HQAL – What’s Going On At My House?

Three weeks have passed again. I already mentioned that the cats made it difficult for me to quilt. I said that I would get lots accomplished during The Super Bowl, which I did not! Between the game being a good one and the fun commercials to watch and all the food and drink that Peter was plying me with, I didn’t put in a stitch. Now we’re up to the Olympics and I am not doing much either. Too much skating and speed skating to watch…And we have been busy during the day.

I am still quilting the third center quarter.

What I have been doing? Painting! We’ve been living with this dreadful color in the guest room for four years. It’s like a cave – a vampire’s cave. I like red, but this is a black red and nothing goes with it. Even my favorite red and white quilt is swallowed up in the darkness of it.

You can see that there was a large desk built in the nook area. Without the desk it will be a nice sitting area.

The desk is gone – Peter ripped it out! Then we painted the whole room with a primer so that I could “see” to audition paint colors. Over the years I have tried many colors. There were paint chips taped all over the room.

When I went to Sherwin Williams the other day to get some paint on sale, I looked at their color wall again. I wanted an interesting neutral. I came home with two more samples and fell in love with one. Look at this paint!

That is what I call an interesting color! SW6547 Silver Peony.

We call it Helio. Years ago, I bought a blouse and the color in the catalog said helio. I looked it up in the dictionary and it said helio is the color when the sun has set; it’s a pinky purple-ish blue. Very peaceful and it changes as the light in the room does. Now to arrange furniture and hang mirrors and pictures and look forward to our first guests in the brand new room…

oh…and to quilt…

P.S. I am sorry that I was in such a rust to post this that I forgot to add the links for the other quilters who are participating! Excuse me!

This Hand Quilt Along is an opportunity for hand quilters and piecers to share and motivate one another. We post every three weeks, to show our progress and encourage one another.  If you have a hand quilting project and would like to join our group contact Kathy at the link below.

Kathy, Lori, Margaret, Kerry, Emma, Tracy, Deb, Connie, Susan , Jessica  , SherryNanette, Sassy,  Edith ,  Sharon and Bella.

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Happy Chinese New Year…of the Dog

woof! woof!

If you were born in 2006, 1994, 1982, 1970, 1958, 1942, etc, this is your year.

Here is a darling foundation pieced dog to celebrate the season. He is a very old pattern, which I found and ripped out from the November 1995 issue of Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine! At the time, I really didn’t quite understand foundation piecing and I lived in Shanghai China so there was no one to ask. The pattern is by Helen Giddens.

I think he needs a bigger googly eye, but this was the only size I had for him. I don’t know if this pattern is copyrighted and I have not been able to find out about that. If you are interested in having a copy of him, let me know in the comments.

Go out and have a yummy Chinese dinner tonight, even if you aren’t a dog. ;-D

 

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New/Old Rug Hooking Project

I do like to hand quilt, but doing the same hand motion repeatedly can lead to pain and carpal tunnel, so I thought hooking would be a nice break. The project I talked about doing in this post turns out not to be something to do while watching the Super Bowl and the Olympics. Soooo I dug around for something else, and I came across this rug which I have started twice! The designs originally were for first time hookers and are reminiscent of sampler quilts that I have done over the years. I liked the idea of a sampler rug and if I teach beginning hooking again, I can point at the squares and ask “which one would you like to do?”. Teachers of any sort of craft end up with a lot of (useless) samples. Here you can see students working on the heart and flower pattern in the middle row on the right.

When I began the rug, we lived in Illinois and I was into dark colors. They don’t appeal to me now (in South Carolina). So I ripped out the squares I had done and started hooking some marbelized dyed fabrics, which I think are so fun.

Then I stopped because I wasn’t happy with this square – is it too busy? I’ve decided to try another square and mull this one over.

You can see in the picture of the whole rug that there are empty squares between the patterned ones. And of course, in the tradition of these sort of antique rugs, I need to decide what to hook in the alternate squares. I looked at rugs for sale online and stole these to show you and consider for myself.

This is a beauty!

Here is a real log cabin look.

Stripes would be the easiest and use lots of wool strips up. This makes me think of a runner in my grandparents’ house that I’ve wonderred about since I began hooking. I wish I knew if it was a hand made one.

And the caption on this wonderful design said it is made of vintage ladies wool bathing suits! I really like the scallop-y nature of this filler…

Lots of fun choices!

Happy Super Bowl Sunday! Peter is starting to prepare the game day food as I write this…

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