Teaching an Extreme Beginning Quilt Class: the preparation

I had the pleasure of teaching a beginning quilt class at the Glen Ellyn Public Library last week. I thought that those of you who like to teach or who are looking for new places to offer classes, might like to know how I plan and execute this type of class. I enjoy these groups because you get such a variety of curious people, much more so than when you teach at a quilt shop. I dub them extreme beginning classes as most people have not worked with a needle and thread…

I started teaching at libraries a few years ago. We have a friend whose wife is a librarian and in charge of programs. She is always looking for new ideas and when her husband told her about my studio full of fiber stuff, she called me and we came up with a plan. The libraries in this area pay about $100 per 2 hour class. It sounds like a lot, but I provide everything (except scissors) and so I have a lot of preparation. In these days of high gas prices, they will often add some money for that. The participants pay a $5 fee. More than paying for the class, I’m told that the fee makes people actually come to the class.

Of course I teach my favorite hand sewing shape – hexagons – and sometimes baby blocks.  It’s worked well. Nancy, my first librarian, has been in charge of  enrichment activities for years and she helped me shape my class.

Here is what I take:

  • Threaded needles! Nancy was very concerned that people could not thread needles and that sure is true! (Bad lighting plays a big part) In the photo below you can see pieces of pink felt with the threaded needle and a few pins.
  • The template for them to make and use at home.
  • Mechanical pencils, plastic templates, sandpaper, scissors and thread
  • A sample ready to sew. You need “swap outs” as they are called on TV, so I have some hexes ready to sew together and some sewn and ready to attach to the middle. (Use contrasting thread so that the ladies can see your stitching.)

  • Six hexes cut and ready for the students to sew for the “petal” area of the Grandmother’s Flower.
  • Fabric choices for the middles.

  • An iron, an extension cord and a towel to press on. I do want to show them the whole process and pressing is an important step.
  • Rulers for them to add the quarter-inch seam.

A word of warning – librarians may push you, so be careful what you commit to! My second gig was for a librarian who had done some quilting with her church. I tried to sell her the GFG class but she wanted more. (In hindsight I think that she chose the class for her needs rather than the participants’) I had taken some quilts to show her and she chose two patterns she liked…… She wanted me to teach this basket and an Ohio Star and include everything they would need! It’s hard to remember why I agreed but it was a tremendous amount of work to prepare for and then to teach. And waaaaaaay too complicated for most of the group. Simple is better!!!

Do not forget to bring extra fabric, needles, supplies, everything!!! I did not bring extra fabric when teaching the flower basket class and it was a disaster! Luckily not everyone who signed up was able to come and so I took apart the kits and quickly cut some pieces, but the librarian was quite annoyed. And I was so angry with myself for getting hornswoogled into teaching an inappropriate beginning project!

3 thoughts on “Teaching an Extreme Beginning Quilt Class: the preparation

  1. Thank you for the insight! I’ve been asked to teach a beginning class at my church and have been struggling on how to prepare for it.

    • People seem to enjoy piecing hexagons and Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilts are often quilts they know about. You might try English Paper Piecing. Oddly enough, they work very well with non sewers. Good luck!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s