A Rug Hooking Show!

I am a member of ATHA – which stands for Association of Traditional Hooking Artists! Quite a mouthful and funny to many, I know. In case you don’t, I’m writing about hooking as in Rug Hooking. Every two years ATHA has a biennial show, and recently it was held in Denver, Colorado. This was the perfect chance to head back there (we lived in Colorado for many years) to see relatives and friends and to drive, drive, drive.

Rug hooking shows are few and far between. I have no idea how many hookers there are, but not many in terms of a craft like quilting.

The most impressive entry was this behemoth! The sizes were not listed on the tags, but it was at least 5′ x 8′. Feet!  It was designed and hooked by Maynard Tischler. The piece was beautifully done and there are so many <winks> to rug hooking. I’d love to know what he does with it – is it used on the floor or hung on the wall?

This rug was amazing and full of fun details! Alice in Wonderland was designed by Margaret Master and hooked by Lynda Stout. It too was quite large.

Here is a detail so that you can see all that is happening in this great pattern! Just about every character that I could remember from the book was included.

Another rug in the category of fun childrens’ themes was Lizards and Ladders by Gail Dufrense of Goat Hill Designs. She is known for her textured hooking, amazing color and unusual designs.

I was quite taken by this little piece. Anything that can be pulled through the backing fabric (burlap, linen,cotton) can be used to achieve wonderful texture. I am not very good at that. In Three Flowers, designed by Bea Brock and hooked by Helen Mar Parkin, you can see how each flower is hooked differently. I will be saving this photo to inspire me.

This sweet little guy, Gimli, really caught my eye! His warm brown color is so striking against the dark blue background – he really pops! No wonder he’s so beautifully hooked – he’s designed and hooked by Sally Kallin, who owns Pine Island Primitives .

Vintage Blooms was designed and hooked by Theresa Rapstine. Doesn’t it have the look of an antique runner? The colors have a lot to do with that, but the other reason is that the wool strips look to be hand ripped.

Here is a close up so that you can see what I mean… So many wonderful colors and types of wool are included and I bet those wide strips feel so good on bare feet. I’d have this rug beside my bed. I rarely use a wide cut of fabric, but this rug and several others have me thinking about it.

While attending the show, I met a longtime blog buddy, Laura, of High On Hooking fame. We forgot to take pictures of us, but do check out her blog. She hooks a lot more than I do and uses some interesting materials.

It was a very nice show and thanks to all the ATHA members who made it possible.

Ta-dah!

Handwoven Hand Painted Silk Shawl

Here is the completed shawl!

In case you didn’t read the post before this one, here is one of the painted warps that I made with Neal Howard at the Southeast Fiber Forum.

After consulting my notes and emailing Neal a few times for added support, I got the warp on the loom. It was pretty exciting to see it all spread out and admire the colors!

I wove several tests to check the sett (how close the warp threads are) and then unwoven them. The warp was not long enough to weave a test and cut it off and re-tie it. The weekend was rather hectic and I didn’t really haver a plan…

I wove to the bitter end and there was enough warp for the length that I wanted.

And here is a fun part – unwinding the woven fabric!

The next step was to finish off the ends in some fashion. When I wear a scarf I always fiddle with the fringe and I did feel that this shawl wanted to have an elegant ending. I’ve never made twisted fringe before and it was quite fun to do.

Then into the sink it went. It would seem that many of us are nervous about silk! It is incredibly strong and durable but it is also delicate. I washed it with shampoo in warm water and rinsed in warm as well. Neal informed us that silk will keep its wrinkles when washed in cold water. It was surprisingly heavy and took some time to dry on towels on the back porch, though it didn’t help that it was a humid South Carolina day.

Here is a close-up of the weave, which is a plaited twill. The pattern was very fun to weave and easy to see treadling mistakes.

The details for the weaving nerds:

Henry’s Attic Cascade Silk 3/2

15 epi

Pattern: Plaited Twill from A Weaver’s Book of 8 Shaft Patterns by Handwoven page 101

I’m delivering it on Thursday to Greenville Center for Creative Arts for the Annual Member’s Showcase. It’s always exciting to see your work in a gallery. If you live in the area, the show will be up for 6 weeks and most of the artwork is for sale.

Southeast Fiber Forum – April 2019

April found me at Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts to participate in the Southeast Fiber Forum. I discovered this group a few months ago and they have gatherings every other year. I haven’t been to a weaving workshop in many, many years, but I was intrigued by a workshop called WTF. Wow That’s Fun was a silk painting workshop!  I’d never worked with silk and thought this would be great.

The Arrowmont campus is tucked behind all the madness of the main drag of Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Even in April, the street was always crowded with tourists. Though there are dormitories, I stayed at a hotel within walking distance. I don’t do dormitories anymore…. I should also mention that meals were included with our weekend fee and they were delicious! The dining room was a great spot to relax, wind down and get to know the other participants. I really enjoyed talking with weavers again!!!

Here is our studio for the weekend. There was lots of space and so many supplies to play with.

Our instructor, Neal Howard, weaves amazing silk clothing and scarves. Check out her work here .  She did several demos for us and was willing and able to answer all of our questions. I believe that all of us had dyed before, but most of us were new to silk and warp painting (or space dyeing) and felt timid about handling silk.

The photo above shows Neal’s warp with one layer of dyes on it. We all gasped when she dunked the whole thing into another color…such a dramatic change!

It was such a great class! Everyone had such a different take on color and ideas on what they planned to weave. Unfortunately I am only in touch with one woman from the workshop and I am looking forward to seeing her finished scarves. Here are a bunch of warps drying outside on Saturday afternoon.

The fiber weekend was Thursday through Sunday. Saturday night after the evening program, all the studios were open so that we could see what all the classes were doing. Here are my two warps. The left one is for a shawl and the right one is for a scarf. Our class probably had the least interesting display because it was a process class rather than a product one.

The other workshop that I debated taking was called Warp it! Paint it! Weave it! with Kathie Roig. I did warp painting years ago with the wonderful Randy Darwall at Penland School of Crafts. The catch here was that you had to bring a loom with you, and at the time I did not have a portable loom. Below you see some of Kathie’s work. What I found so surprising was that they used paint rather than dye! I assumed that the fabrics would be stiff and opaque, but the opposite was the case. These are double weave fabrics and the colors just sing!

Here is a warp that’s been painted and is drying. The loom is out of the picture and you can see the reed in front. When the warp dried, it was be wound on the loom. In the far right background of the picture, you can see that someone has started to weave their warp. The gallery on Kathie’s website shows the lovely fabrics that the class wove.

It was a terrific weekend and I thank everyone at the Southeast Fiber Forum for planning it!

 

And a Million More…

Last weekend I hoped to be teaching a workshop using equilateral triangles, but months ago when as I was choosing dates, I did not notice that it was Easter weekend. (I needed 3 people and had 2!) It was another pattern/class I had offered before and was not enamored with. For the class sample I sewed these pieces together in an impressionistic way. It was fun to play with the colors and values but not practical for students with no fabric stashes. I ran out of steam sewing them but I will get back to them one day.

While searching around, I stumbled onto the pattern called Thousand Pyramids. What a wonderful way to sew together masses of triangles. If you Google them online, you will find so many fabric versions of this pattern, from vintage to modern. I think I’m in the middle with my black and white backgrounds. Each pattern pyramid includes a print with a small all over design as well as a colored fabric that reads as a solid for the background. This top is about done as the scratchy looking black and white fabric is all cut . Sometimes it’s nice to have a restriction.

Here’s another variation that I quite like. I chose a black fabric with lots of little multicolored hearts on it and am piecing it with two values of plain fabrics left over from a jelly roll that I bought for a lone star. I have a lot of strips still and can share them with anyone who might want tp piece it this way.

For the sessions this Summer, I am offering Grandmother’s Flower Garden and Tumbling Blocks again, so I don’t need to work on samples. Tumbling Blocks are made from 60 degree diamonds and my new favorite variation of that is this Seven Sisters pattern. The question I asked my Instagram buddies was, “What do you think of a hexagonal quilt?”. It’s about 60″ at the widest bit and it does look nice draped on the back of the couch. I will investigate how to fill in the edges and see what that will look like. So…what do you think?

The Summer class listing online is not “up” yet, but if you are local and interested, check it out here.

 

A Thousand Tiny Stitches…

… and the development of a quilt class!

Although I have been quiet here for a long while, I’ve been busy. I finally decided that I’d like to offer some quilting classes at the art center where I volunteer. Developing new classes of any sort takes a lot of time, energy and thought, but even more so when the samples are hand sewn. I finally got myself in gear and have offered several workshops at Greenville Center for Creative Arts  and much to my delight, most have had enough students to run! I wasn’t at all sure – at the moment, most of the classes are of the fine art variety and who knew if anyone would be interested in “sewing”. My assumption is that “my audience” does not have machines and are beginners, so the classes have been hand sewing ones. And I’ve been correct so far. These quilts can be called geometric, charm or one patch designs and are frankly easier to sew by hand. I do hope to lure some “seasoned” quilters.

When I think up a class idea, I start to madly sew. Proposals must be submitted long before the workshop is advertised and I’ve gotten skilled at making enough squares so that it looks like I have an entire quilt in the photographs that I submit!

Here are the offerings so far:

Hexagons!

If you follow me, you know I’m crazy about hexagons. There’s not much new to show you, but I did do some piecing with half hexagons to add to the design choices. They are so wonderfully dimensional and modern looking for those who think that hexies look like a pattern their grandmother made.

60 Degree Diamonds!

Some years ago, I offered a class using these diamonds and it did not run. They can be made into the vintage pattern called Baby Blocks or Tumbling Blocks, but although I admire those quilts, I didn’t enjoy piecing them for a quilt. I have used them for pillows and squares in a sampler type quilt.

Thank heavens for Pinterest; I found this version with Baby Blocks rotating around a plain (dark) star. It’s an interesting pattern because you see both the stars and the blocks. I tend to like things to coordinate or have a rule and for some reason these are random enough that I have just been piecing blocks and sewing them to the stars.

As I was stitching away one day, I remembered that the pattern called Seven Sisters uses 60 degree diamonds, and I started researching those patterns online. Bingo! I had found a pattern I love stitching! Here is one square so you can see why it’s called Seven Sisters. I do have a rule for each square. I choose a multi-colored batik fabric and that is the star in the middle. Then I choose some of my hand dyed fabrics to make the remaining six stars. Repetition is not my strong suit and using different colors in each star piece keeps me amused.

And here is the quilt top so far. Can you see the underlying pattern – ha! – it’s a hexagon! My design dilemma with this quilt will be how to end it. The initial plan was to piece seven sisters of seven sisters, but I don’t think I want the quilt to be a hexagon. Stay tuned on that…

… and for more stitching to come!

Nick is Home for Christmas!

Nick has spent the last year at Island Quilters located on Hilton Head Island. He evidently traveled with Owner Beth to several quilt shows and talks, though he hasn’t said much about that. I must thank Beth for giving me the pattern and many of the supplies. Fusing is not my favorite thing to do, but he was fun to make.

After lots of measuring and engineering, Peter got Nick hung in the great room! It is so fun to come into the room and see his funny self. I’m not sure the reason, but this is the first time we have ever hung a quilt over the fireplace. Next year I have several quilts that can rotate in this area.

Let the celebrations begin!

Hand Piecing Workshops!

Although I’ve been quiet on a daily dose, I’ve been working! It’s been a year full of deadlines for classes and workshops. All things that I wanted to do, but it’s kept me very, very busy.

I finally got myself in gear and offered two Summer workshops at Greenville Center for Creative Arts, where I volunteer. Much to my delight, I got enough students to run the class! I wasn’t at all sure – at present, most of the classes are of the fine art variety and who knew if anyone would be interested in making quilts.

The first workshop I offered was Hand Pieced Quilts – Grandmother’s Flower Garden. This will be no surprise to any of you who have been followers for a while – I love to sew hexies! I had a lot of samples and ideas and it was perhaps a bit much for the five women who hadn’t had much exposure to the world of quilting.

Olivia was a very enthusiastic sewer. She told us that she sewed a lot and enjoyed making dolls to sell. I am confident that she will get a throw made with the speed that she sews.

Sarah designed a very striking flower, didn’t she? It is fun to see how people put together fabrics.

The second workshop was Hand Pieced Quilts: 60 degree diamonds (or tumbling blocks or baby blocks). I have offered this before and wasn’t very enthusiastic about it. Though I like baby blocks, I’ve never enjoyed sewing them.

As I prepared for the class, I perused Pinterest and was reminded that a setting for 60 degree diamonds is called the Seven Sisters pattern. I noodled around with that and discovered that I really liked this version! (Perhaps because it makes a giant hexagon….)

Here is a starry, blocky setting for the diamonds. I like this variation as well.

Just about everything needed is included in my workshops. When working with new sewers, I don’t want them to have to run around and buy a lot of supplies. The quilt patterns I am offering are traditionally scrap quilts and goodness knows that I have a lot of fabrics! It’s been fun sharing my stash and seeing others incorporate the fabric in their own work.

I am very fond of holiday themed quilts so I was delighted to see that Shawn brought a Halloween selection to make baby blocks.

It’s been interesting to offer quilt classes to novices. In the past, I have taught in quilt stores and generally my students have had some sort of experience or exposure to quilting. Most of my students at the Art Center were very, very new! In the Grandmother’s Flower Garden class, I presented way too much material and I am learning to scale back what I initially present and see where the students want to go.

Next up; workshops that I hope to offer this Winter. ;-D

Sauder Village Rug Hooking Week – More Rugs!

There were shows within shows at Rug Hooking Week. Ellen Banker curated one dealing with words and I’d like to share some of those with you, as well as some of the many rugs in the show that included words.

This is one of my favorite Ellen rugs, called Lost Cow. Can’t you just see that hanging in a bookstore or coffee shop?

Another Ellen favorite – A Rug Hooker’s Sampler. What a fun idea to make each letter a separate design. I also really like the asymmetry of it.

This rug, which Ellen brought to class, was particularly intriguing to me. You can see Baltimore hooked quietly into the background, but do you also see that Baltimore refers to the designs? The rug is made up of bits of Baltimore Album quilt patterns. I just love this idea and may have to steal it one day.

I am always a sucker for a sheep! Marian Hall designed and hooked this wonderful sheep rug, entitled Herdwick Tup. She also dyed to wools for it, and was our official wool supplier in class.

Ellen and Marian designed this magnificent rug together, Speaking Shakespeare. That is a lot of small script in narrow wools to hook, and it is done beautifully.

You may remember that I took a class some years ago with Donna Hrkman. She designs and hooks the most amazing rugs! They are often monochromatic and usually include words. I happened to run into her at the show and she said that she had finished this incredible rugs just days before she needed to deliver it.

Donna had so much to say about this rug, which is called Best Friends, that here are her words: (And isn’t the Dayton Public Library lucky?)

This concludes my reports from Sauder Village Rug Hooking Week! I hope you enjoyed seeing it through my eyes.

Sauder Village Rug Hooking Week – the class!

Though I love looking at hooked rugs, Archbold OH is a long way to drive. Several years ago I went to Sauder Village and took some workshops. I’ve been hoping ever since to find a class I liked and was delighted to see this one by Ellen Banker – The Unconventional Rug Hookers Guide to Samplers. If you read Rug Hooking Magazine, you have seen her work and read her articles. I’m a big fan so I got signed up.

As part of the class, all the hookers {I know many of you are smiling…} got a sampler to practise on. Ellen demonstrated a variety of techniques and then we hooked them on our sampler. Another project to be continued…

For the next part of the class, we could work on a design of our own or use one of three sampler designs offered by Ellen. Most of us decided to work on an Ellen Sampler. {Though I do have a sampler design, I thought it best to work on Ellen’s and play with mine another time.} Here is one of Ellen’s sampler designs….No. 10. I debated getting this one as I very much like the big carrot and the bunnies. Aren’t the carrots delicious looking?

But in the end, I chose Sampler No. 3 because I like the flower pot and all of Ellen’s quirky birds. I’ve been trying to hook a bit each day and have been playing with the flowers and stems and leaves. The birds are under design review right now. There is a lot of background and I am also wondering if I might add a border. I have done lots of counted cross stitch samplers and they usually have a border. {Less background to hook!}

Should you be interested, Ellen has written a book, Hooked on Words.

As well as a how-to guide, it’s filled with wonderful and quirky samplers she has made. She also researched rugs hooked by other artists and so many inspiring examples are included. An interesting rug often has a story behind it and Hooked on Words is a good read!

Sauder Village Rug Hooking Week – the show!

Wow! What a great time I had at the epicenter of rug hooking last week at Sauder Village. Classes, rugs, wool, fun people, rugs and more rugs….

The show was wonderful and full of all sorts of mini shows and exhibits. Let’s start with a rug I was DElighted to see in person – – – The Conspiracy by Marion Sachs. I’d seen it in print but nothing compares to viewing the real rug. The rug is adapted from a painting by David Galchutt. Do check out his website to see more incredible work.

The Royal Couple was designed by Pris Butler and masterfully hooked by Sibyl Osicka. I’m not sure which tickled me most – the authenticity and realistic hooking, or the fact that she hooked sheep faces!

And isn’t this rug charming? Gypsy Mice was also hooked by Sibyl Osicka and designed by Pris Butler from a painting by David Galchutt! He must be the new darling of the rug hookers and with good reason.

Alexander and Stuart was designed and hooked by Patricia Merikallio. I am really drawn to the colors and the wonderful paisley border. Patricia said in her description that she started with a painting from 1810, substituted her granddaughter’s face and added Stuart the cat.

Off the track of antique-looking rugs, here are two travel ones. I adore this one – the colors, the car, the maps! I’m sure many of us remember these days… (We had a station wagon and I as the littlest sat on “the hump”.) The rug is called Red Lodge and was designed and hooked by Anne Bond of Visions of Ewe.

The second travel rug is by Shawn Niemeyer who designed and hooked Life is a Beautiful Ride. The rug has such rich colors and the circles all along the border are a fun touch, and probably not very easy to finish!

I will end with this rug, terrifically different from the previous rugs. There were so many different sorts of designs to admire in the show.  Martha Rosenfeld created Cafe Shadows. It seems quite elegant to me.

Hope you enjoyed a few of my favorite rugs. I’ll be back with more of my week in Ohio with the other hookers….