A New Project: Orphan Blocks Mash-Up

I have been trying to decide what quilt to piece next. Perhaps in the spirit of the New Year, I have been sorting through bins and a few boxes and looking over UFO’s. And orphan blocks. I had one idea, which I was all ready to work on and tell you about, but then I started digging around some more. There were fabrics that went with the blocks I wanted to work with and I couldn’t find them. They are some of my favorite primaries and though I did {horrors!} throw out a good bit of fabric when we moved, I knew I would never have thrown those away. So I kept digging.

Eureka! As I did more and more excavation, I found a bin of class UFO’s and there was the fabric. And as I contemplated the mess of fabrics and quilt squares scattered around me, the project idea solidified – “What about a mash-up?”.

If you take classes and don’t finish the project, or if you start your own project and then don’t finish it, perhaps you feel guilty, like I do. I won’t take a class unless I like the project, even if I want to learn a particular technique or work with a particular teacher. If I like the project, I do intend to complete the piece, but I often don’t. Peter and I move frequently enough that I do “thin” the UFO’s, but I still have more than I would like. But what to do? Some of these guys are really old and I seriously have no intention of following through with the original idea, so mashing them up seems like a great plan. So –

The UFO’s fall into three large groups color-wise. Crayon colors with a multi colored background. Crayon colors on black and white. Jewel toned colors, mainly batiks, on multi backgrounds. The largest group of squares are the crayon colors on black and whites, and here they are! It’s an interesting assortment and I am hoping to create something very fun and unique with them. I hope you’ll follow along, let me know what you think and perhaps be inspired to make a mash-up of your own! {If you do, let me know and we can link up.}

Orphan block mash-up

 

Studio Update – the design wall!

I’ve always used a “design wall”. When I first started to quilt, I pieced on the dining room table and  taped work in progress to the livingroom wall, but the best scenario is a full-fledged screwed-in-the-wall-push-pin friendly one. It’s important to be able to see your work as it’s progressing, particularly if that work is going to hang on a wall. (If I’m making a bed quilt, I do often lay it on a bed to see how it’s looking.) So here it is –  the design wall is finally done! If you have moved a lot, you know this; anything you want to do in your new house always takes longer than you wish it would! I got a few of the studio walls painted in December hoping to get the board up, but we just completed the project this weekend. {sigh} The difficulty was, as it often is, that we couldn’t find homosote. In case you don’t think you know what homosote is, you do, it’s what a schoolroom bulletin board is made of. It used to be very inexpensive and easy to find, but not anymore. We had to special order it! I have used other material for a design wall, but homosote is the best. It’s thick and you can put long push pins into it. In Japan, we hung double-sided foam core from the ceiling. It worked, but barely. It was so thin that I had to use pins to hold up my designs and it curled in the high humidity. But it’s a good choice if you can’t screw into the wall. Peter is the best installer ever, so patient and accurate, and he has installed a few of these over the years.

Peter leveling

After you decide what to use for the design wall base, the next decision is what to cover it with. You could paint it, but then all the holes show and it can start to crack and fall off. When I was a Second Grade teacher I always covered bulletin boards with burlap and stapled the fabric on the back. However, many fabrics are too narrow and burlap usually is. For the design wall in Highland Park, I used the gridded flannel fabric from eQuilter. It’s a nice quality and a good width, but quite difficult to get the grids even – and if you’re going to have lines on it you want them to be even!  The homosote is  4′ x 8′ and we only cut a bit off this piece so the light switch could be used. I went to Joann’s to see if perhaps they had designer burlap, which is wider, and I made a great find!  The fabric covering the homosote is felt , it came in a nice white, and best of all, it’s 72″ wide. I discovered it in the store by the burlap which was not even 42″. (I hate seams on a design wall…) This baby is screwed in tight!

New design wall!

For some reason, having the design wall installed always makes me feel like I’m really home! 

Ready to work!

With the design wall hung, I was able to dig out the zinnia and sunflower from their moving package and carefully pin them up to inspire me. I cannot wait to quilt these two!!!